Posted by: Lisa Hill | March 16, 2015

Book review: The Anchoress, by Robyn Cadwallader

I’m not ready to read this book, not yet, but I’d like to promote it, so do visit this enticing review of The Anchoress by Robyn Cadwallader, at Amanda Curtin’s blog, Looking Up Looking Down

looking up/looking down

The scenario is claustrophic: in medieval England, Sarah, a seventeen-year-old virgin, relinquishes worldly life—family, human touch, comfort, light, fresh air—and is locked into a tiny stone cell attached to the village church. It is voluntary. And it is permanent. The door to the cell, or anchorhold, is nailed shut. Sarah conceives of this as ‘the nailing of my hands and feet to the cross with Christ’ but an equally fitting comparison would be the nailing of a coffin, because the anchorhold is to be Sarah’s home and also her grave: lest there be any doubt, she is told that the bones of a previous anchoress, Sister Agnes, are interred beneath her. Her life’s work is to devote herself to prayer—for the edification of the village and the soul of the wealthy landowner who is her patron.

9781460702987I was sent a copy of Robyn Cadwallader’s debut novel in preparation for a…

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Responses

  1. Enticing is the word, another immediate purchase!

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  2. Thank you, for helping me find this blog and wonderful review. I wonder when this book is available in Canada.

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    • Delighted to help:) Perhaps it will be available as an eBook before long?

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  3. I read and reviewed this one for the Aussie Author Challenge. I was initially drawn in by a love of historical fiction and the disbelief that such a small setting could hold a story that would keep my attention. Did it ever! I didn’t even stop to cook dinner. Propped it up on the cupboard and kept reading while I chopped and peeled.

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    • Hello Sandy, and welcome:)
      How nice to hear from you: we had Polar Boy in the library and some of the Samurai Kids series in our reading materials at school, the kids loved them.
      I am transfixed by the image of you reading and chopping at the same time!

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