Posted by: Lisa Hill | November 22, 2016

2017 International Dublin Award Longlist

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

see Joseph’s review at Rough Ghosts

The Dublin International is a prize that’s a bit hit-and-miss for me: any longlist that has both Submission by Michel Houellebecq and The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins can’t be really be trusted to deliver good reading, IMO.

Still, there are some titles – especially amongst the translated fiction – that I know are good reading because I’ve seen reviews from trusted bloggers, and it’s nice to see that we in The Antipodes are so well represented on the list as well.

The shortlist will be announced on 11 April 2017 and the winner on 21 June 2017, and you can find out more at the official website.

FWIW, here’s the longlist, with links to my reviews.  Australian and New Zealand nominees are in bold, and they feature in the slideshow.  When I have time I will hunt around to find my fellow-bloggers’ reviews of other ones as well.

 

A General Theory of Oblivion by José Eduardo Agualusa – Translated from the Portuguese by Daniel Hahn, see Tony’s review at Messenger’s Booker and Joseph’s at Rough Ghosts

Woman of the Dead by Bernhard Aichner – Translated from the German by Anthea Bell, see the Complete Review

The Automobile Club of Egypt by Alaa Al Aswany – Translated from the Arabic by Russell Harris, see my review

Fifteen Dogs by André Alexis, see Kim’s review at Reading Matters

The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende – Translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor & Amanda Hopkinson

A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson

The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood

Dry Season by Gabriela Babnik – Translated from the Slovene by Rawley Grau, see Joseph’s review at Rough Ghosts

My Grandmother Sends Her Regards and Apologises by Fredrik Backman – Translated from the Swedish by Henning Koch

The Blue Guitar by John Banville, see my review

Beatlebone by Kevin Barry, see Kim’s review at Reading Matters

Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume, see Kim’s review at reading Matters

The Sellout by Paul Beatty, on my TBR

Inside the Black Horse by Ray Berard

The Long and Faraway Gone by Lou Berney

Sweet Caress by William Boyd

The Harder They Come by T.C. Boyle

Clade by James Bradley, see Peter Pierce’s review at the Sydney Review of Books

The Secret Chord by Geraldine Brooks, see my review

The Weather Changed, Summer Came and So On by Pedro Carmona-Alvarez – Translated from the Norwegian by Diane Oatley

Out in the Open by Jesus Carrasco – Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa

Forever Young by Steven Carroll, see my review

It I Fall, If I Die by Michael Christie

The Birthday Lunch by Joan Clark

Did You Ever Have A Family by Bill Clegg

Confessions of the Lioness by Mia Couto – Translated from the Portuguese by David Brookshaw

Coming Rain by Stephen Daisley, see my review

The Meursault Investigation by Kamel Daoud – Translated from the French by John Cullen, see Tony’s review at Messenger’s Booker and Joseph’s at Rough Ghosts

Ancestral Affairs by Keki N. Daruwalla

The Devil You Know by Elisabeth de Mariaffi

The Bollywood Bride by Sonali Dev

Undermajordomo Minor by Patrick deWitt, see Kim’s review at Reading Matters

Hollow Heart by Viola di Grado – Translated from the Italian by Antony Shugaar

The Heat by Garry Disher

The Green Road by Anne Enright, see Kim’s review at Reading Matters

Against Nature by Tomas Espedal – Translated from the Norwegian by James Anderson, see Tony’s review at Messenger’s Booker

Hausfrau by Jill Alexander Essbaum, see Kim’s review at Reading Matters

The Mirror World of Melody Black by Gavin Extence

Where My Heart Used to Beat by Sebastian Faulks

The Turner House by Angela Flournoy

The Pope’s Daughter by Dario Fo – Translated from the Italian by Antony Shugaar

Purity by Jonathan Franzen

Hope Farm by Peggy Frew, see my review

Our Endless Numbered Days by Claire Fuller, see Kim’s review at Reading Matters

The Mare by Mary Gaitskill

A Place Called Winter by Patrick Gale, see my review

The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George – Translated from the German by Simon Pare

Craving by Esther Gerritsen – Translated from the Dutch by Michele Hutchison

Gliding Flight by Anne-Gine Goemans – Translated from the Dutch by Nancy Forest-Flier

The Physics of Sorrow by Georgi Gospodinov – Translated from the Bulgarian by Angela Rodel, see Tony’s review at Messenger’s Booker

Best Boy by Eli Gottlieb

Chappy by Patricia Grace, see my review

Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff

City on Fire by Garth Risk Hallberg

The Silent Room by Mari Hannah

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

Delicious Foods by James Hannaham

One Minute to Midnight by Diyar Harraz

Dictator by Robert Harris

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

This Place Holds No Fear by Monika Held – Translated from the German by Anne Posten, see Kim’s review at Reading Matters

The Making of Zombie Wars by Aleksandar Hemon

The Illegal by Lawrence Hill

Submission by Michel Houellebecq – Translated from the French by Lorin Stein, see Tony’s review at Messenger’s Booker

Black River by S.M. Hulse

The Evening Chorus by Helen Humphreys

Avenue of Mysteries by John Irving

The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro, on my TBR

The Star Side of Bird Hill by Naomi Jackson

Day Boy by Trent Jamieson

The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin

Where All Light Tends To Go by David Joy

The World Without Us by Mireille Juchau, see my review

Man on Fire by Stephen Kelman

The African Equation by Yasmina Khadra – Translated from the French by Howard Curtis

The Helios Disaster by Linda Boström Knausgård – Translated from the Swedish by Rachel Willson-Broyles

Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll

Imperium by Christian Kracht – Translated from the German by Daniel Bowles

The Festival of Insignificance by Milan Kundera – Translated from the French by Linda Asher, see Tony’s review at Messenger’s Booker

Fortunate Slaves by Tom Lanoye – Translated from the Dutch by Michele Hutchison

The Prophets of Eternal Fjord by Kim Leine – Translated from the Danish by Martin Aitken

The Great Swindle by Pierre Lemaitre – Translated from the French by Frank Wynne, see my review

Birdie by Tracey Lindberg

The Discreet Hero by Mario Vargas Llosa – Translated from the Spanish by Edith Grossman

The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli – Translated from the Spanish by Christina MacSweeney, see my review

Bits of Heaven by Aishah Madadiy

Don’t Forget to Remember by Sonia Mael

The Offering by Grace McCleen

The Antipodeans by Greg McGee, on my TBR (I keep forgetting to read it because it’s on my Kindle)

Circling the Sun by Paula McLain

Slade House by David Mitchell, on my TBR

A Reunion of Ghosts by Judith Claire Mitchell

The Legend of Winstone Blackhat by Tanya Moir, (abandoned, on my Kindle, maybe I should try it again)

The Promise Seed by Cass Moriarty

Signs for Lost Children by Sarah Moss

The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen, see my review

Till Kingdom Come by Andrej Nikolaidis – Translated from the Montenegrin by Will Firth, see Tony’s review at Messenger’s Booker and Joseph’s at Rough Ghosts

Girl at War by Sara Nović

Uprooted by Naomi Novik

The Fishermen by Chigozie Obioma, see my review

The Little Red Chairs by Edna O’Brien, see Kim’s review at Reading Matters

Miss Emily by Nuala O’Connor

The Illuminations by Andrew O’Hagan

Orhan’s Inheritance by Aline Ohanesian

Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta

When The Doves Disappeared by Sofi Oksanen – Translated from the Finnish by Lola M. Rogers

Asking for It by Louise O’Neill

A Strangeness in My Mind by Orhan Pamuk – Translated from the Turkish by Ekin Oklap

The Horn of Love by Bozin Pavlovski – Translated from the Macedonian by Vesna N Krsteski

The Lost Child by Caryl Phillips

A Measure of Light by Beth Powning

The Watchmaker of Filigree Street by Natasha Pulley

Above the Waterfall by Ron Rash

You Have Me to Love by Jaap Robben – Translated from the Dutch by David Doherty

Feast of the Innocents by Evelio Rosero – Translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean & Anna Milsom

Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights by Salman Rushdie, see my review

The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota

The Kindness by Polly Samson

The Mystics of Mile End by Sigal Samuel

A Whole Life by Robert Seethaler – Translated from the German by Charlotte Collins, see Tony’s review at Messenger’s Booker

Ghachar Ghochar by Vivek Shanbhag – Translated from the Kannada by Srinath Perur

The Book of Aron by Jim Shepard

Yo-yo by Steinunn Sigurðardóttir – Translated from the Icelandic by Rory McTurk

The English Spy by Daniel Silva

The Chimes by Anna Smaill, see my review

Golden Age by Jane Smiley

Before the Feast by Saša Stanišić – Transtlated from the German by Anthea Bell

The Winter War by Philip Teir – Translated from the Swedish by Tiina Nunnally

Duke by Sara Tilley

The Last Flight of Poxl West by Daniel Torday

Salt Creek by Lucy Treloar, see my review

The Orange Grove by Larry Tremblay – Translated from the French by Sheila Fischman

A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler

The Jaguar’s Children by John Vaillant

Aquarium by David Vann, see my review

The Illogic of Kassel by Enrique Vila-Matas – Translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean & Anna Milsom, see Tony’s review at Messsenger’s Booker

Yugoslavia, My Fatherland by Goran Vojnović – Translated from the Slovene by Noah Charney, see Joseph’s review at Rough Ghosts

The Dying Grass by William T. Vollmann

Ledger of the Open Hand by Leslie Vryenhoek

My Sunshine Away by M.O. Walsh

Gold Fame Citrus by Claire Vaye Watkins

These Are The Names by Tommy Wieringa – Translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett

The Gap of Time by Jeanette Winterson

The Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood, see combined reviews

Weathering by Lucy Wood

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

Eighty Days of Sunlight by Robert Yune


Responses

  1. You say: “any longlist that has both Submission by Michel Houellebecq and The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins can’t be really be trusted to deliver good reading, IMO.”

    I don’t know either of these books and have only heard of one of the authors – but that is because I rarely read fiction but intend to do so more now. Can you expand on this comment because I don’t understand it.

    Thanks!

    Lynne

  2. That sounded rude and it wasn’t meant to be – I am curious, not critical and I do usually put question marks on questions.

    Sorry!

    Lynne

    • No problem, Lynne, I didn’t interpret your comment as rude at all.
      Michel Houellebecq writes difficult, provocative philosophical stuff, and The Girl on the Train is a popular fiction bestseller, so what I was trying to say was that this longlist is such a ‘broad church’ that you can’t rely on it to guide your reading because the award doesn’t really stand for anything. It’s just done from library nominations, and libraries vary wildly in what they promote as good reading. Some years the winner is wonderful, and other years it’s disappointing or lacklustre.

  3. Some of my favourite books ever, and my introduction to seriously reading in transition came from this award, but it is wide ranging, especially at this stage. Still there is always something new to look for (or sitting on the shelf that should be read sooner rather than later). I am thrilled to see three Istros Books entries (and I have reviewed all three, btw—Yugoslavia, My Fatherland is quite good). Two Seagull Books and a couple of my favourite independent publishers get a nod too, so I’m happy for them.

  4. Ye Gods! What a lengthy long list!

    • Imagine being a judge!

  5. Their longlists are ridiculously long!!
    I’ve read 3 and 1/2 of them, Mr Books 2. Several more in my TBR pile, but such a diverse list – it’s doing my head at this time of night after a long day at work!!

    • Yes, it’s not a list you can actually use to help you choose what to read. But they have come up with some beaut winners in the past, so maybe the judges are good at weeding the list – though how they do it, I don’t know. It would take me the best part of a year to read 147 books…

  6. What a l-o-n-g list! There doesn’t appear to be any culling at all of the nominated titles from all the public librairies. The list, as such then, isn’t of much use until the short list is announced. What an ‘interesting’ way to administer a book prize.

    • It would be good if someone could explain the process for getting to a shortlist. I mean, I reckon I could whittle it down to about a hundred just by knowing and being not very interested in some author’s names. (This kind of prejudiced judging would hardly be fair, of course, I know). But then what? I’m a fast reader but it would still take me six months at least to read a hundred books.

  7. I’m happy to see 15 Canadian books on this list (10 of which I’ve read). I’ll be interested to see if you can rustle up a review of Inside the Black Horse by Ray Berard, a Canadian living in New Zealand. This is the first I’ve heard of him.

  8. Thanks for all the links, Lisa! I’ve also read Hausfrau (and hated it), Our Endless Numbered Days, A Place Called Winter, and This Place Holds No Fear (a wonderful book that didn’t get any attention from press or bloggers last year).

    • Ah yes, I remember reading your Hausfrau review at the time!

  9. Great piece & a lovely slide show!! (I’m a woeful Luddite). There are indeed some phenomenal reads on the IMPAC longlist; many I utterly adored & impassioned sell. inclusion of from the Canadian nominees (my forte), it’s reassuring to see included: Did You Ever Have A Family by Bill Clegg / The Turner House by Angela Flournoy /The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli / The Illuminations by Andrew O’Hagan /The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota & more.) However, “Girl on a Train.” Yikes! Methinks the ‘hit & miss’ has horrendously ‘missed’ on that & few other nominees we call’ light reads.’ I agree with Naomi that it is sometimes difficult to get access to published works from New Zealand & Australia. Oftentimes, anything ‘non’-U.S.A. is not easily available &/or, it’s released far after the book’s initial pub. date. It’s is a ‘serious peeve’ for me & other booksellers & a disservice to literary fiction readers everywhere.Ah well…simply makes me more determined! I’m curious to see the (much-shorter) shortlisted titles. Thanks Lisa for the post & review links, BB’s

    • Thanks, BB … what I find surprising is that we here in OZ can easily mostly get books from all over the world – but our books aren’t so readily available elsewhere. We need to be much better at exporting them IMO.


Please share your thoughts and join the conversation!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: