Posted by: Lisa Hill | November 18, 2017

2017 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards Shortlist

The 2017 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards shortlist has been announced (at last!)

I’m in Geelong for the Word for Word festival with slow hotel WiFi so this is just a quick heads up for the fiction, poetry and NF shortlist, for the others, and for other information visit their website.

Fiction

The Easy Way Out by Steven Amsterdam (see my review)

The Last Days of Ava Langdon by Mark O’Flynn (see my review)

Their Brilliant Careers by Ryan O’Neill (see my review)

Waiting by Philip Salom (see my review)

Extinctions by Josephine Wilson (see my review)

Poetry

Painting Red Orchids by Eileen Chong

Year of the Wasp by Joel Deane

Content by Liam Ferney

Fragments by Antigone Kefala

Headwaters by Anthony Lawrence

Non Fiction

Mick, a Life of Randolph Stow by Suzanne Falkiner (on my wishlist)

The Art of Time Travel, Historians and their Craft, by Tom Griffiths (see my review)

Our Man Elsewhere, in search of Alan Moorehead by Thornton McAmish (on my TBR)

Quicksilver  by Nicolas Rothwell

The Art of Rivalry by Sebastian Smee


Responses

  1. Pleased to see The Easy Way Out there. A sensitive issue tackled well.

    • Yes, but I am very cross with the way the palliative care industry is sabotaging Victoria’s Voluntary Assisted Dying bill. I have no patience with people who say that if we just make PD more available it will give everyone a ‘good’ death. It’s not their decision to make.

      • It’s been voted down several times here in the UK, despite seeming popularity for the idea in the polls.

        • Yes, typical, politicians and the medical profession think they know better..

          • I think in our case it’s the bishops in the House of Lords but, yes, politicians are also wary of the issue

            • There are bishops in the House of Lords?? I never knew that!

              • Oh, yes…26 of them.

                • Do other religions get a spot on the team too?

                • No, It’s because the Church of England is the state church.

                • Hmm, sounds like a case for reform to me. I don’t think religious representation has any place in a secular society…

                • I couldn’t agree more but reform of the House of Lords has been an issue for decades. Tony Blair’s government with its splendid majority did a little tinkering in terms of hereditary peers but there’s still much to do and, of course, we have other things on our minds these days.

  2. […] I did not notice the remarkable predominance of  Australian small independent presses in the 2017 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards shortlists.  I’m going to speculate here about possible […]


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