Posted by: Lisa Hill | July 2, 2019

2019 Miles Franklin Award shortlist

Here they are:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Responses

  1. No Boy Swallows Universe and no The Lucky Galah?! I am hopeless at predicting these things.

    Like

    • I thought Boy Swallows Universe a terrific read but I always thought the end was going to go against it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • LOL I thought that book was going to win the Stella next! How many awards has it won, is it four now?

        Like

    • I still can’t believe that the didn’t even longlist Shell and The Bridge…and I found The Lebs so distasteful I didn’t get beyond 50 pages.
      As we so often say, there’s no accounting for tastes.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I haven’t read any of these and I’ll be honest in saying none of them are on my radar.

        Like

        • Then I’ll put in a plug for Too Much Lip because I think you’d enjoy it. And *wink* you could do a review of it for #IndigLitWeek!

          Liked by 1 person

  2. I could! Looking at this list, that’s the only one I would read.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’ve read ‘Dyschronia’ and ‘The Death of Noah Glass’, but none of the others. Yet.

    Like

    • What do you think of Noah Glass? I find Jones a bit hit and miss, more miss with her later books than the earlier ones.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I liked Noah Glass. I can’t really explain why, but it worked for me.

        Like

        • I do have Guide to Berlin on the TBR, I should read that before buying anything else, I guess:)

          Liked by 1 person

  4. I like the title ‘A Stolen Season’. I hope it wins :)

    Like

    • HI Vishy,. thanks for visiting:) It was a very interesting book: there’s not a lot of novels tackling the issue of injured servicemen after war time service in our own time.

      Like

      • It looks like a very interesting story, Lisa. Will add it to my wishlist. Thanks for sharing your thoughts :)

        Like

        • As a matter of interest, Vishy, is the subject of military service one that gets written about much, in India? I’m just thinking of the conflicts that been ongoing in your part of the world. (I’ve read a couple about the conflict in Sri Lanka, notably The Story of a Brief Marriage).

          Like

          • That is a very interesting question, Lisa :) I have seen a few novels on military service from an Indian perspective, but they are mostly written like an action novel with some romance. I haven’t seen a literary type war novel or military novel yet. There are novels written about the Kashmir situation, which depict the conflict there, and talk about how the situation has affected people, but they are not really military service / war type novels.

            Like

            • Maybe it’s too soon. I read recently that Russian authors are mostly revisiting the Soviet years rather than dealing with contemporary events.

              Like

  5. I agree with you on Gail Jones. ‘Guide to Berlin’ did not live up to expectaions. to write home about. One positive it pushed me to Nabakov a writer avoided and have since shifted my view. It must have been something to do with Lolita a subject I was not interested in even though his gift of language is astounding it would not have been enough.
    I will read Rodney Hall as it is a subject close to me and reading for me has to be a kind of learning even when it is something already learned.

    Like

    • I admit, it was because of the Nabokov allusion that I bought it. I’ve only read Lolita, and that was years ago at uni, but I’ve articles about and by him and I think he’s interesting.

      Like

  6. I have only read his short stories which I have enjoyed mostly. Maybe should take the plunge now and read Lolita.

    Like

    • I wonder if they still include it in university reading lists now. It’s not the erotic novel people think it is: it’s surrealist and ironic IMO, and not meant to be taken literally. But there are plenty of other great C20th novels that are less likely to cause a ruckus on campus!

      Like


Please share your thoughts and join the conversation!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Categories

%d bloggers like this: