Posted by: Lisa Hill | October 15, 2014

Richard Flanagan wins the Booker Prize 2014!

The Narrow Road to the Deep North
I was thrilled to hear this morning that Richard Flanagan has won the Booker Prize with his magnificent  novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North. 

The Narrow Road to the Deep North has been reviewed widely:

©Lisa Hill

Author: Richard Flanagan
Title: The Narrow Road to the Deep North
Publisher:  Knopf, 2013
ISBN: 9780857981486
Source: Personal library, purchased from Benn’s Books Bentleigh

Availability

Fishpond:  The Narrow Road to the Deep North (hbk); The Narrow Road to the Deep North(pbk); and also the audiobook The Narrow Road To The Deep North


Responses

  1. Who needs a Miles Franklin?! ;)

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    • Ah well, I was sorely tempted to mention that…
      I have sworn to keep myself nice about it online, but if we ever meet over a fine glass of wine somewhere, I’ll tell you exactly what I think about the travesty that the MF has become!

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  2. So…I did get a copy of this on my trip back home, and have to say I was rather disappointed. Still, it’s always good to see an Australian author lauded.

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    • I was disappointed with it too, mantalini, but I did admire it, especially the ambition and ‘largeness’ of it, if that makes sense, and wanted it to win this one, and thought it was a definite for the MF.

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      • Well, I’m relieved I’m not the only one. Although like you Jenny I didn’t think it was all ghastly. It was just I didn’t think that the love story was well conceived, and the writing was far too over-wrought, and the framing character was … well, more of a frame than a character.

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        • Yes everyone seems to have loved it, but there are a few who weren’t absolutely won over. I wanted to love it, but agree with your points esp re the love story.

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      • One of the things I admire most about it is that it’s a story for all of us: the POWs are such a special part of our history and they have been honoured in this book as never before, without sentimentalising. I was astounded when it didn’t win the MF, 2014 will be remembered in our literary history in the same way that 1995 (The Hand That Signed the Paper) is remembered for having made a dreadful mistake.

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  3. I also thought of you when I heard this news Lisa, and knew that you would be happy. I would love to hear your views on the MF. I’m really happy for RF that he won this one, it’s a great achievement.

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  4. Thanks for the surge of activity on my blog – can’t see any other reason for it.

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    • Lots of excited Aussies reading your review!

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  5. As you know, I’m delighted he won this. I’ve championed his work for years and often felt like I was talking into the abyss, so *finally* he may just get the worldwide attention he deserves. His intelligence, wisdom and humanity resonate off the page. I’ve only just discovered he’s a Rhodes scholar; I can’t say I’m surprised. He talks so much sense about so many things: a proper deep thinker.

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    • I’m fond of many authors, but Richard Flanagan is the one I admire most for the way he takes on really big issues that matter. Every time I hear him speak or read his books I feel inspired to try to be a better person.

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  6. Yay! I just finished the book yesterday and thought it was marvelous, allthough difficult to read in places – glad an Aussie won even though I’m American.

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    • Yay, I’m glad you loved it too – it’s a universal story:)
      I had them all in stitches at work today when I was *still* raving on about how “we” won the Booker. I suspect that this is how most normal people feel when “they” win something at the Olympics, eh?

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  7. Two Antipodean Booker winners in a row — with the new rules allowing the Yanks in, ANZ can now claim it is the acknowledged centre of quality fiction written in English :-) . Well done.

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    • Next, I want someone from South Africa to win it. Zakes Mda, or someone like that…

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  8. Great news

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  9. This is wonderful news, Lisa! Last year it was a New Zealander and this year it is an Australian – ANZ literature rocks! Australia, you beauty! I loved what KevinFromCanada said – that ANZ is now the acknowledged centre of quality fiction written in English.

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    • Oh, I think we would say that we are *an* acknowledged centre, one of many. There is so much great writing around the world, how lucky we are to be able to enjoy it:)

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  10. […] Lisa at ANZLitlovers has posted on Richard Flanagan’s (exciting-to-us) Booker Prize win for The narrow road to the deep north, and has provided links to reviews by several bloggers. So, I thought I’d do something different. In my review and follow-up post, I discussed the role of poetry in the novel. Reviewer (and novelist) Romy Ash suggests that there are two love stories in the book, the second one being a “love letter to literature”. […]

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  11. I was thrilled to see Flanagan win. I have read one other short listed novel and dabbled in two more. Flanagan’s effort is far superior, not even in the same category. I was worried it would be pipped at the post for being such a ‘traditional’ and old fashioned type of winner.
    The more time that passes since I read it, the more I admire it. It’s a difficult read but a wonderful literary effort.
    Here’s my review: http://wp.me/p3dB1g-hu

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    • I confess to not having read any of the Booker nominees yet. I have History of the Rain on the TBR (it didn’t make the shortlist) but none of the others excited me much. *chuckle* I loved your review of We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves – that should have got a prize for the most naff title of the year IMO.

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